Self-care for anxiety

Insights into anxiety and panic attacks, outlining potential causes, treatment options, and self-help tips. It’s designed to guide not only those experiencing anxiety but also their friends and family.

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Talking About Your Anxiety

Discussing your feelings with someone you trust can be incredibly relieving. Whether it’s a friend, family member, or a call to organisations like the Samaritans, sharing your worries can lighten your emotional load.

For tips on managing panic attacks, take a look at our section on managing panic attacks.

Joining a peer support group can be incredibly beneficial. Sharing experiences and coping strategies with those who have similar experiences can make you feel less isolated and more empowered.

Anxiety often means you can’t stop worrying. You might feel like you can’t control your worries, or that you need to worry to prevent bad things from happening.

Trying new ways to handle your worries can be useful. For example:

  • Choose a certain time each day to think about your worries. This way, you’ll know you haven’t ignored them. Setting a timer might help.
  • Write your worries down and keep them in one spot, like a notebook, or pieces of paper in an envelope or jar.

Make sure you get enough sleep. Good sleep helps you handle tough emotions and situations better. For tips on sleeping well, check out our advice on sleep problems.

Watch what you eat. Eating at regular times and keeping your blood sugar steady can help improve your mood and energy. Learn more on our food and mood page.

Stay active. Moving around and exercising can really boost your mental health. For ideas, see our information on physical activity.

Simple breathing exercises can help you regain a sense of control. Practising regular relaxation techniques can be beneficial. The NHS offers guidance on breathing exercises for stress relief. Remember, taking deep breaths is essential, especially during panic attacks.

Writing down when you feel anxious or have a panic attack might help you see what triggers these feelings or notice when they’re about to start.
Don’t forget to write down the good stuff too. When you’re anxious, it’s easy to focus only on worries and challenges. Remember to be kind to yourself and acknowledge the positive moments as well.

Peer support means getting together with people who have been through similar things to help each other out. It’s a good way to share tips, make friends, and feel less alone. Here’s what you can do:

  • Look up organisations that help with anxiety. Websites like Anxiety Care UKAnxiety UKNo More Panic, No Panic, and Triumph Over Phobia UK have information about support groups and other resources.
  • Check out Side by Side, Mind’s friendly online community.
  • Call Mind’s Infoline to ask about support groups in your area, or get in touch with your local Mind office directly.
  • For more about peer support and how to find a group that’s right for you, visit our peer support pages.

If you’re new to online support groups, make sure to read up on how to keep safe online.

Various alternative therapies might help in managing anxiety, such as:

  • Yoga

  • Meditation

  • Massage

  • Reflexology

  • Herbal treatments

  • Bach flower remedies

  • Hypnotherapy

These methods can aid relaxation and improve sleep. Health shops and pharmacies often provide these remedies and can offer advice on their use.

Get support

Talk with a trained professional about your thoughts and feelings with out free counselling and private counselling service for people over the age of 18.

Counselling Private Counselling